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America Helping China

When Gerhard Schroeder suggested lifting the EU's arms embargo on China, many Americans were furious. Never mind that there was never sufficient support for such a move in Germany and in the European Union. Anyway, it now seems that China will profit in some other ways from the United States. The Washington Times:
A Chinese company with ties to Beijing's military and past links to Saddam Hussein's army in Iraq and the Taliban will gain access to U.S. defense-network technology under a proposed merger, Pentagon officials say. (...) Rep. Duncan Hunter, California Republican and ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee, said he is worried the deal will lead to the loss of sensitive technology to China.
Also, the government of Iraq makes an arms deal with China. Washington Post:
Iraq has ordered $100 million worth of light military equipment from China for its police force, contending that the United States was unable to provide the materiel and is too slow to deliver arms shipments, Iraqi President Jalal Talabani said yesterday. The China deal, not previously made public, has alarmed military analysts who note that Iraq's security forces already are unable to account for more than 190,000 weapons supplied by the United States, many of which are believed to be in the hands of Shiite and Sunni militias, insurgents and other forces seeking to destabilize Iraq and target U.S. troops.
This reminds me of Representative Murtha's statement from 2006: "The only people who want us in Iraq is Iran and al-Qaeda." Well, European policy analysts want Americans to stay in Iraq as well...

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James Versluys on :

"When Gerhard Schroeder suggested lifting the EU's arms embargo on China, many Americans were furious. Never mind that there was never sufficient support for such a move in Germany and in the European Union." A bit on the biased side, don't you think? The way support stays insufficient is due to political wrangling: if the State Department hadn't made signals, then the US would find itself in the position of uploaded EU technology throughout the Chinese military within a few years. The sentences imply a completely static attitude toward matters of trade...not exactly a sophisticated approach. You also seem to be rather blissful about the entire notion of "import" and "export": importing some AK-47's is a bit different than high-tech transfers of technology to China, wouldn't you say? This whole thing seems rather willfully obtuse.

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